A little bit of history: it all started in 1927. At that time, only traditional grape varieties from the Champagne region were authorised to produce the wine called Champagne, in order to ensure quality standards. That was what made thi... Read more

Twil's regional suggestions for Champagne

  • Champagne
    Champagne Dérouillat
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
  • Champagne
    Champagne Chartier
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
    3.5/5
  • Champagne
    Champagne de Barfontarc
    No vintage - white - Vin de France - Sans origine géographique
  • -11%
    Champagne
    Champagne Bernard Figuet
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
    4/5
  • Champagne
    Champagne Albert Beerens
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
  • Champagne
    Champagne Bouquet
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
  • Champagne
    Champagne Bouquet
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
    3.5/5
  • Champagne
    Champagne Deutz
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
    3.5/5
  • Champagne
    Champagne AR Lenoble
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
  • Champagne
    Champagne Pol Cochet
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
  • Champagne
    Champagne Marinette Raclot
    No vintage - sparkling - Champagne
  • Champagne
    Champagne Claude Farfelan
    No vintage - white - Champagne

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Region
Buy wines from Champagne, France

A little bit of history: it all started in 1927. At that time, only traditional grape varieties from the Champagne region were authorised to produce the wine called Champagne, in order to ensure quality standards. That was what made this sparkling wine unique, setting it apart both from other wines made in the region and from other sparkling wines. Today the Champagne appellation contrôlée region encompasses 3,400 ha and four major subregions: Côte des Bar, Vallée de la Marne, Côtes des Blancs and Montagne de Reims. There is a difference between the Champagne houses (or merchant houses) and Champagne winegrowers. The former are at the root of Champagne's fame around the world, and they produce big-name wines that are instantly recognisable. The latter cultivate their own vines and occupy their own place in the wider chain of production. There are a multitide of different Champagnes to suit every festive occasion for the wine's many fans. Brut, dry, white, "grand cru", vintage or rosé – how do you like it?

Good to know

Winemakers

Listed 703 winemakers

Production

90% sparkling wines, 5% red wines and 5% rosés

Area

26 000 ha

Soil and subsoil

Limestone (constant natural irrigation)

Grape variety

Reds and rosés : pinot noir, meunier

Whites : Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, Arbanne and Petit Meslier